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  • VHL protein (anatomy)

    hypoxia: …oxygen conditions, a protein called von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) undergoes chemical modification enabling it to bind to HIF, thereby marking HIF for degradation. However, when oxygen levels are low, VHL is not modified and therefore cannot attach to HIF; as a result, HIF persists. Elevated HIF levels enable cells to survive…

  • VHP (political party, Suriname)

    Suriname: Political movements: …Reform Party (later called the Progressive Reform Party [Vooruitstrvende Hervormde Partij; VHP]) and the Indonesian Peasants’ Party (now the Party of National Unity and Solidarity [Kerukunan Tulodo Pranatan Inggil; KTPI]). Universal suffrage was instituted in 1948.

  • VHS (electronics)

    videocassette recorder: … format by Sony and the VHS format by the Matsushita Corporation in the 1970s, videocassette recorders became sufficiently inexpensive to be purchased by millions of families for use in the home. Both the VHS and Betamax systems use videotape that is 0.5 inch (13 mm) wide, but the two systems…

  • Vi mordere (play by Kamban)

    Gudmundur Kamban: …“Marble”) and Vi mordere (1920; We Murderers), as well as in his first novel, Ragnar Finnsson (1922), all of which are set in America, attention is focused on crime and punishment. Questions about societal versus personal responsibility are posed with compassion for the human individual and are closely linked to…

  • VI Olympic Winter Games

    Oslo 1952 Olympic Winter Games, athletic festival held in Oslo that took place Feb. 14–25, 1952. The Oslo Games were the sixth occurrence of the Winter Olympic Games. With the awarding of the 1952 Winter Olympics to Oslo, the Games were held for the first time in a Scandinavian country. Some

  • Via Dolorosa (street, Jerusalem)

    Jerusalem: Municipal services: Additionally, parts of the Via Dolorosa, said to follow the path along which Jesus carried the cross to Golgotha, have been repaved to facilitate the Christian Holy Week pilgrimage.

  • Via Lucis (religion)

    Stations of the Cross: …been recently supplemented with the Via Lucis (the Way of Light), in which the meditations focus on the resurrected Christ.

  • via militare (Roman road)

    roads and highways: The Roman roads: Twenty-nine great military roads, the viae militares, radiated from Rome. The most famous of these was the Appian Way. Begun in 312 bc, this road eventually followed the Mediterranean coast south to Capua and then turned eastward to Beneventum, where it divided into two branches, both reaching Brundisium (Brindisi). From…

  • via negativa (mysticism)

    Christianity: Eastern Christianity: …on the “apophatic” or “negative” approach to God. Through a gradual process of ascension from material things to spiritual realities and an eventual stripping away of all created beings in “unknowing,” the soul arrives at “union with Him who transcends all being and all knowledge” (Mystical Theology, chapter 1).…

  • VIA Rail Canada, Inc. (Canadian railway system)

    VIA Rail Canada, Inc., Canadian state-owned passenger-railway system. Incorporated in 1977 and established in 1978 as a crown corporation independent of the Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP) railroads, VIA gradually assumed full responsibility for managing all the country’s

  • Via?ao Aérea S?o Paulo (Brazilian airline)

    Brazil: Aerospace: …S?o Paulo State Airline (VASP), which handles mainly domestic flights; and Transbrasil.

  • Viacom Inc. (American company)

    Viacom Inc., one of the largest and foremost communications and media conglomerates in the United States. The present form of the corporation dates from 1994 when Viacom Inc., which owned radio and television stations and cable television programming services and systems, acquired the

  • Viadana, Lodovico da (Italian composer)

    concerto: The Baroque vocal-instrumental concerto (c. 1585–1650): By contrast, Lodovico da Viadana’s popular and influential Cento concerti ecclesiastici a 1, a 2, a 3, e a 4 voci, con il basso continuo per sonar nell’organo (100 Ecclesiastical Concertos [i.e., motets] for One, Two, Three, and Four Voices, with the Basso Continuo to be Played…

  • Viadua (river, Europe)

    Oder River, river of east-central Europe. It is one of the most significant rivers in the catchment basin of the Baltic Sea, second only to the Vistula in discharge and length. For the first 70 miles (112 kilometres) from its source, it passes through the Czech Republic. For a distance of 116 miles

  • Viaduc des Arts (shopping centre, Paris, France)

    Promenade Plantée: …the elevated portion is the Viaduc des Arts, which stretches along the Avenue Daumesnil. Its former archways house specialized commercial establishments.

  • viaduct (bridge)

    Viaduct, type of long bridge or series of bridges, usually supported by a series of arches or on spans between tall towers. The purpose of a viaduct is to carry a road or railway over water, a valley, or another road. The viaduct is both functionally and etymologically related to the aqueduct,

  • Viage del Parnaso (work by Cervantes)

    Miguel de Cervantes: Publication of Don Quixote: In 1614 Cervantes published Viage del Parnaso, a long allegorical poem in mock-mythological and satirical vein, with a postscript in prose. It was devoted to celebrating a host of contemporary poets and satirizing a few others. The author there admitted that writing poetry did not come easily to him.…

  • Viagem ao princípio do mundo (film by Oliveira [1997])

    Manoel de Oliveira: …ao princípio do mundo (1997; Voyage to the Beginning of the World) featured Marcello Mastroianni’s final screen role.

  • viagem maravilhosa, A (work by Gra?a Aranha)

    José Pereira da Gra?a Aranha: …the year before his death, A viagem maravilhosa (1929; “The Marvelous Journey”). His aesthetic views were further publicized in his essays A estética da vida (1925; “The Aesthetics of Life”) and O espírito moderno (1925; “The Modern Spirit”).

  • Viagens na Minha Terra (novel by Garrett)

    Portuguese literature: Drama and the novel: …Viagens na minha terra (1846; Travels in My Homeland) he used the models provided by Irish-born English novelist Laurence Sterne and French author Xavier de Maistre. Many, however, preferred to follow the lead of Herculano, including Oliveira Marreca, Arnaldo Gama, and Pinheiro Chagas. Popular successes among historical novels were A…

  • Viaggi di Enrico Wanton (work by Seriman)

    Italian literature: The Enlightenment (Illuminismo): Viaggi di Enrico Wanton (1749–64; “Travels of Enrico Wanton”), a philosophical novel by the Venetian Zaccaria Seriman, which tells of an imaginary voyage in the manner of Jonathan Swift and Voltaire, was the most all-embracing satire of the time.

  • viaggio a Reims, Il (cantata by Rossini)

    Gioachino Rossini: Parisian period: …had been staged, he composed Il viaggio a Reims (“The Journey to Reims”), a cantata improvised for the coronation of Charles X.

  • Viaggio in Italia (film by Rossellini [1954])

    Ingrid Bergman: Scandal and later films: …and Viaggio in Italia (1954; Journey to Italy). During this time she married (1950–57) Rossellini, and the couple had two more children, including Isabella Rossellini, who became a noted model and actress.

  • Viagra (drug)

    Viagra, trade name of the first oral drug for male impotence, introduced by the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, Inc., in 1998. Also known by the chemical name sildenafil citrate, it is one of a category of drugs known as phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. See also PDE-5

  • Viaje a la Semilla (work by Carpentier)

    Alejo Carpentier: Viaje a la semilla (1944; Journey Back to the Source), for instance, set in 19th-century Cuba, is told in reverse, from the protagonist’s death to his return to the womb. This and other stories would be collected in the important volume Guerra del tiempo (1958; War of Time). Carpentier’s second…

  • viaje entretenido, El (work by Rojas Villandrando)

    Agustín de Rojas Villandrando: …author whose most important work, El viaje entretenido (“The Pleasant Voyage”), a picaresque novel in dialogue form, provides a valuable account of the Spanish theatre in the 16th century and of the life of the actors. He is also considered the cleverest writer of loas (laudatory dramatic prologues) of his…

  • Vian, Boris (French author)

    French literature: Sartre: …of Sartre were captured in Boris Vian’s L’écume des jours (1947; Froth on the Daydream). Sartre’s patronage of Jean Genet, Cocteau’s discovery, helped confirm the reputation of Genet, whose novels of prison fantasy and homosexual desire added to the radical ferment of the 1940s (among them Notre-Dame-des Fleurs [1943; Our…

  • Viana, Carlos de Aragon, príncipe de (Spanish prince)

    Carlos de Aragon, prince de Viana, heir apparent to the throne of Navarre (from 1428), who intrigued for both the Navarrese and Aragonese crowns. The son of the future John II of Aragon and Blanche, daughter of Charles III of Navarre, who succeeded her father in 1425, Carlos was accepted as heir

  • Viander, Le (work by Tirel)
  • Vianen (Netherlands)

    Hendrik van Brederode: …had held the lordship of Vianen south of Utrecht, Brederode became known as a spirited soldier and succeeded to the family titles in 1556. In 1564 he joined the league of great nobles that successfully petitioned Philip II of Spain to remove Antoine Perrenot de Granvelle, virtual head of the…

  • Vianen, Adam van (Dutch silversmith)

    auricular style: …silversmiths and brothers Paulus and Adam van Vianen. Paulus was inspired by anatomy lectures he attended in Prague, and both he and Adam became known for the style. The auricular style was adopted by other cabinetmakers and carvers in the Low Countries and Germany.

  • Vianen, Paulus van (Dutch silversmith)

    auricular style: …by Dutch silversmiths and brothers Paulus and Adam van Vianen. Paulus was inspired by anatomy lectures he attended in Prague, and both he and Adam became known for the style. The auricular style was adopted by other cabinetmakers and carvers in the Low Countries and Germany.

  • Viangchan (national capital, Laos)

    Vientiane, largest city and capital of Laos, situated on a plain just northeast of the Mekong River. The city’s central river port location in a country relying heavily on its rivers for transportation and its surrounding hinterland of intensive rice cultivation have made Vientiane the major

  • Vianney, Saint Jean-Baptiste-Marie (French priest)

    St. John Vianney, ; canonized May 31, 1925; feast day August 4 [formerly August 9]), French priest who was renowned as a confessor and for his supernatural powers. He is the patron saint of parish priests. Because of the French Revolution, Vianney received little education. Given the anticlerical

  • Vianney, St. John (French priest)

    St. John Vianney, ; canonized May 31, 1925; feast day August 4 [formerly August 9]), French priest who was renowned as a confessor and for his supernatural powers. He is the patron saint of parish priests. Because of the French Revolution, Vianney received little education. Given the anticlerical

  • Vianu, Tudor (Romanian author)

    Romanian literature: After World War II: …and psychological works, and by Tudor Vianu, who revealed in his writings a materialistic and methodological approach after first having adhered to the aesthetic school.

  • Viardot, Michelle Ferdinande Pauline (French singer)

    Pauline Viardot, French mezzo-soprano, best known for highly dramatic operatic roles. As a child Viardot studied piano with Franz Liszt, composition with Anton Reicha, and voice with her mother. She was the sister of Maria Malibran, the celebrated soprano, and of the great voice teacher Manuel

  • Viardot, Pauline (French singer)

    Pauline Viardot, French mezzo-soprano, best known for highly dramatic operatic roles. As a child Viardot studied piano with Franz Liszt, composition with Anton Reicha, and voice with her mother. She was the sister of Maria Malibran, the celebrated soprano, and of the great voice teacher Manuel

  • Viareggio (Italy)

    Viareggio, town, Toscana (Tuscany) regione, central Italy. It lies along the Ligurian Sea, south of the Apuan Alps, just northwest of Pisa. Sheltered by dense pine woods and possessing a famous 5.5-mile (9-kilometre) beach of fine sand, it is one of Italy’s most popular seaside resorts and has a

  • Viassolo, Giovanni Battista (Italian actor)

    Camillo Federici, Italian dramatist and actor, whose comedies were highly popular in the late 18th century. Federici was educated at Turin and showed at an early age a great fondness for literature and especially for the theatre. The praises bestowed on his early attempts determined his choice of a

  • Via?a Romaneascǎ (Romanian periodical)

    Romanian literature: The 20th century: …political ideology of the periodical Via?a Romaneascǎ (“Romanian Life”) (1901) was similar to that of the Russian Narodniki, members of a movement known as narodnichestvo (“populism”) that was centred on awakening the peasantry to the ills of autocratic power. The critic Constantin Dobrogeanu Gherea’s theories followed Karl Marx, although Western…

  • Via?a ?i petrecerea sfin?ilor (work by Dosoftei)

    Romanian literature: The old period: …to Romanian literature was his Via?a ?i petrecerea sfin?ilor (1682–86; “Lives of the Saints”), in which he introduced popular idioms and encouraged the development of a more flexible prose style.

  • viatical settlement (insurance)

    Viatical settlement, arrangement by which a terminally ill patient’s life-insurance policy is sold to provide funds while the insured (viator) is living. The buyer (funder), usually an investment company, pays the patient a lump sum of 50–80 percent of the policy’s face value, pays the premiums

  • Viatka (Russia)

    Kirov, city and administrative centre of Kirov oblast (region), western Russia, on the Vyatka River. The city was founded as Khlynov in 1181 by traders from Novgorod and became the centre of the “Vyatka Lands,” settled by Russians in the 14th to the 15th century. In 1489 it was captured by Moscow.

  • Viau, Théophile de (French author)

    Théophile de Viau, French poet and dramatist of the pre-Neoclassical period. Born into a Huguenot family of the minor nobility, Viau went to Paris, where he soon won a reputation as the leader of the freethinkers (libertins). He was briefly house dramatist to the H?tel de Bourgogne in Paris,

  • Viaud, Louis-Marie-Julien (French author)

    Pierre Loti, novelist whose exoticism made him popular in his time and whose themes anticipated some of the central preoccupations of French literature between World Wars. Loti’s career as a naval officer took him to the Middle and Far East, thus providing him with the exotic settings of his novels

  • Viaud, Théophile de (French author)

    Théophile de Viau, French poet and dramatist of the pre-Neoclassical period. Born into a Huguenot family of the minor nobility, Viau went to Paris, where he soon won a reputation as the leader of the freethinkers (libertins). He was briefly house dramatist to the H?tel de Bourgogne in Paris,

  • vibes (musical instrument)

    Vibraphone, percussion instrument that has tuned metal bars and is similar in shape to a xylophone. Felt or wool beaters are used to strike the bars, giving a soft, mellow tone quality. Suspended vertically below each aluminum bar is a tubular, tuned resonator that sustains the tone when the bar

  • Vibhanga (Buddhist text)

    Abhidhamma Pitaka: …popular in Sri Lanka, (2) Vibhanga (“Division” or “Classification”—not to be confused with a Vinaya work or with several suttas bearing the same name), a kind of supplement to the Dhammasangani, treating many of the same topics, (3) Dhatukatha (“Discussion of Elements”), another supplementary work, (4) Puggalapannatti (“Designation of Person”),…

  • Vibia Perpetua (Christian martyr)

    Perpetua, Christian martyr who wrote The Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicity, a journal recounting her trial and imprisonment that was continued by a contemporary who described Perpetua’s death in the arena. Both her martyrdom and its account have been highly revered by ancient and modern

  • Vibo Valentia (Italy)

    Vibo Valentia, town, Calabria regione, southern Italy. It lies near the Gulf of Sant’Eufemia. It originated as the ancient Greek town of Hipponion and was praised in the 1st century bc by the Roman statesman and author Cicero. There is a museum of Greek antiquities, and ruined Greek walls can be

  • Viborg (Denmark)

    Viborg, city, north-central Jutland, Denmark. It lies northwest of ?rhus. Originally a centre of pagan worship, Viborg (English: “sacred hill”) was a royal town and the early capital of Jutland. According to legend, it was from Viborg that King Canute set out to conquer England. The kings of

  • vibraculum (anatomy)

    moss animal: Zooids: …form of zooid is the vibraculum, in which the operculum has become a whiplike seta (i.e., hairlike projection). The functions of avicularia and vibracula are not clearly known, but both types of zooids may help to keep the colony free from particles and epizoites (i.e., organisms that attach to the…

  • vibraharp (musical instrument)

    Vibraphone, percussion instrument that has tuned metal bars and is similar in shape to a xylophone. Felt or wool beaters are used to strike the bars, giving a soft, mellow tone quality. Suspended vertically below each aluminum bar is a tubular, tuned resonator that sustains the tone when the bar

  • vibraphone (musical instrument)

    Vibraphone, percussion instrument that has tuned metal bars and is similar in shape to a xylophone. Felt or wool beaters are used to strike the bars, giving a soft, mellow tone quality. Suspended vertically below each aluminum bar is a tubular, tuned resonator that sustains the tone when the bar

  • vibrating conveyor (mechanical device)

    conveyor: Vibrating conveyors consist of troughs or tubes flexibly supported and vibrated by mechanical or electrical means to convey objects or bulk materials; vibration takes place in an inclined, elliptical pattern to cause directional as well as upward movement of the material.

  • vibrating string gravimeter (measurement instrument)

    gravity: Relative measurements: Such vibrating string gravimeters were originally developed for use in submarines and were later employed by the Apollo 17 astronauts on the Moon to conduct a gravity survey of their landing site. Another relatively recent development is the superconducting gravimeter, an instrument in which the position…

  • vibrating-reed electrometer (measurement instrument)

    electrometer: The vibrating-reed electrometer uses a capacitor that has a vibrating reed as one of its plates. Movement of the reed changes the voltage across the capacitor. The output of the electrometer (which is easily amplified without drift) is the current necessary to keep the meter’s capacitance…

  • vibrating-reed tachometer (instrument)

    tachometer: A resonance, or vibrating-reed, tachometer uses a series of consecutively tuned reeds to determine engine speed by indicating the vibration frequency of the machine.

  • vibration (physics)

    Vibration, periodic back-and-forth motion of the particles of an elastic body or medium, commonly resulting when almost any physical system is displaced from its equilibrium condition and allowed to respond to the forces that tend to restore equilibrium. Vibrations fall into two categories: free

  • vibration damper (physics)

    Damping, in physics, restraining of vibratory motion, such as mechanical oscillations, noise, and alternating electric currents, by dissipation of energy. Unless a child keeps pumping a swing, its motion dies down because of damping. Shock absorbers in automobiles and carpet pads are examples of

  • vibration damping (physics)

    Damping, in physics, restraining of vibratory motion, such as mechanical oscillations, noise, and alternating electric currents, by dissipation of energy. Unless a child keeps pumping a swing, its motion dies down because of damping. Shock absorbers in automobiles and carpet pads are examples of

  • vibrational energy (molecular)

    spectroscopy: Vibrational energy states: …being harmonic in nature, the vibrational energy, Ev, equals (v + 12)hν0, where v = 0, 1, 2,… is the vibrational quantum number, ν0 = (12π)(k/μ)1/2, and k is the force constant of the bond, characteristic of the particular molecule. The necessary conditions

  • vibrational energy level (molecular)

    spectroscopy: Vibrational energy states: The rotational motion of a diatomic molecule can adequately be discussed by use of a rigid-rotor model. Real molecules are not rigid; however, the two nuclei are in a constant vibrational motion relative to one another. For such a nonrigid system, if…

  • vibrational quantum number (physics)

    spectroscopy: Vibrational energy states: …0, 1, 2,… is the vibrational quantum number, ν0 = (12π)(k/μ)1/2, and k is the force constant of the bond, characteristic of the particular molecule. The necessary conditions for the observation of a vibrational spectrum for a diatomic molecule are the occurrence of a change in the dipole moment of…

  • vibrational spectroscopy (physics)

    spectroscopy: Infrared spectroscopy: This technique covers the region of the electromagnetic spectrum between the visible (wavelength of 800 nanometres) and the short-wavelength microwave (0.3 millimetre). The spectra observed in this region are primarily associated with the internal vibrational motion of molecules, but a few light molecules…

  • vibrational spectrum (physics)

    spectroscopy: Raman spectroscopy: The observation of the vibrational Raman spectrum of a molecule depends on a change in the molecules polarizability (ability to be distorted by an electric field) rather than its dipole moment during the vibration of the atoms. As a result, infrared and Raman spectra provide complementary information, and between…

  • vibrational state decay (physics)

    spectroscopy: Fluorescence: …(1) undergo a series of vibrational state decays, (2) lose energy through interstate transfer (intersystem crossing), or (3) lose vibrational energy via molecular collisions.

  • vibrato (music)

    sound: Other effects on tone: Vibrato (a periodic slow change in pitch) and tremolo (a periodic slow change in amplitude) also aid the analysis of steady-state sounds.

  • vibrio (bacteria)

    Vibrio, (genus Vibrio), any of a group of comma-shaped bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae. Vibrios are aquatic microorganisms, some species of which cause serious diseases in humans and other animals. Vibrios are microbiologically characterized as gram-negative, highly motile, facultative

  • vibrio (bacterial shape)

    bacteria: Diversity of structure of bacteria: or curved (vibrio, spirillum, or spirochete). Considerable variation is seen in the actual shapes of bacteria, and cells can be stretched or compressed in one dimension. Bacteria that do not separate from one another after cell division form characteristic clusters that are helpful in their identification. For example,…

  • Vibrio (bacteria)

    Vibrio, (genus Vibrio), any of a group of comma-shaped bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae. Vibrios are aquatic microorganisms, some species of which cause serious diseases in humans and other animals. Vibrios are microbiologically characterized as gram-negative, highly motile, facultative

  • Vibrio anquillarum (bacterium)

    vibrio: V. anguillarum is found in diseased eels and other fishes.

  • Vibrio cholerae (bacterium)

    bacteria: Bacteria in medicine: …and the cholera bacterium (Vibrio cholerae), which reproduces in the intestinal tract, where the toxin that it produces causes the voluminous diarrhea characteristic of this cholera. Other bacteria that can infect humans include staphylococcal bacteria (primarily Staphylococcus aureus), which can infect the skin to cause boils (furuncles), the bloodstream…

  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus (bacterium)

    vibrio: …the cause of cholera, and V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus both act as agents of acute enteritis, or bacterial diarrhea. V. anguillarum is found in diseased eels and other fishes.

  • vibriosis (animal pathology)

    livestock farming: Diseases of beef and dairy cattle: Vibriosis, a venereal disease that causes abortion; pneumonia, an inflammation of the lungs; and shipping fever all cause serious losses and are difficult to control except through good management. Broad-spectrum antibiotics (antibiotics that are effective against various microorganisms), as well as powerful and specific pharmaceuticals,…

  • vibrissae (hair)

    Vibrissae, stiff hairs on the face or nostrils of an animal, such as the whiskers of a cat. Vibrissae often act as tactile organs. The hairlike feathers around the bill and eyes of insect-feeding birds are called vibrissae, as are the paired bristles near the mouth of certain flies and the

  • viburnum (plant)

    Viburnum, (genus Viburnum), any of about 175 shrubs and small trees belonging to the family Adoxaceae, native to temperate and subtropical Eurasia and North America, with about 16 species native to Malaysia. Many species are cultivated for their ornamental foliage, fragrant clusters of usually

  • Viburnum (plant)

    Viburnum, (genus Viburnum), any of about 175 shrubs and small trees belonging to the family Adoxaceae, native to temperate and subtropical Eurasia and North America, with about 16 species native to Malaysia. Many species are cultivated for their ornamental foliage, fragrant clusters of usually

  • Viburnum alnifolium (plant)

    viburnum: The American wayfaring tree, or hobblebush (V. alnifolium), native to eastern North America, grows to 3 metres (10 feet) tall; it has roundish leaves, with white flower clusters and red berries that turn purple-black at maturity. The wayfaring tree of Europe, V. lantana, grows to 5…

  • Viburnum dentatum (plant)

    viburnum: …toothed, oval leaves; and the arrowwood (V. dentatum), with roundish to oval, coarsely toothed leaves. Laurustinus (V. tinus), a 3-metre-tall evergreen with oblong leaves, is native to the Mediterranean area. Sweet viburnum (V. odoratissimum), from India and Japan, bears dark-green, shiny, evergreen leaves and large clusters of fragrant flowers.

  • Viburnum edule (plant)

    Dipsacales: Adoxaceae: Red-fruited squashberry (V. edule) inhabits moist woods from Labrador to Alaska, southward into Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Minnesota, and as far west as Colorado and Oregon. Arrowwood (V. dentatum) thrives not only in moist woods but also in swamps. Possumhaw (V. nudum) is largely limited to…

  • Viburnum lantana

    viburnum: The wayfaring tree of Europe, V. lantana, grows to 5 metres (16 feet). The European cranberry, highbush cranberry, or water elder (V. opulus), a small tree reaching 4 metres (13 feet), is native to northern Europe and North Africa. It has three- to five-lobed, maplelike leaves…

  • Viburnum lentago (plant)

    viburnum: rufidulum), similar but taller; the sheepberry, or nannyberry (V. lentago), with finely toothed, oval leaves; and the arrowwood (V. dentatum), with roundish to oval, coarsely toothed leaves. Laurustinus (V. tinus), a 3-metre-tall evergreen with oblong leaves, is native to the Mediterranean area. Sweet viburnum (V. odoratissimum), from India and Japan,…

  • Viburnum macrocephalum sterile (plant)

    Dipsacales: Adoxaceae: dentatum), and Chinese snowball (V. macrocephalum).

  • Viburnum macrocephalum variety sterile (plant)

    Dipsacales: Adoxaceae: dentatum), and Chinese snowball (V. macrocephalum).

  • Viburnum nudum (plant, Viburnum nudum)

    Dipsacales: Adoxaceae: Possumhaw (V. nudum) is largely limited to swamps of the eastern and southern coastal plains of the United States. In contrast, rusty blackhaw (V. rufidulum) and softleaf arrowwood (V. molle) prefer dry rocky woods or hills. Viburnum is also an important horticultural genus; some of…

  • Viburnum odoratissimum (plant)

    viburnum: Sweet viburnum (V. odoratissimum), from India and Japan, bears dark-green, shiny, evergreen leaves and large clusters of fragrant flowers.

  • Viburnum opulus (plant)

    viburnum: The European cranberry, highbush cranberry, or water elder (V. opulus), a small tree reaching 4 metres (13 feet), is native to northern Europe and North Africa. It has three- to five-lobed, maplelike leaves and round heads of white flowers that are followed by hanging clusters of…

  • Viburnum opulus opulus (plant, Viburnum opulus opulus)

    Dipsacales: Adoxaceae: …of its cultivated species include guelder rose (V. opulus), arrowwood (V. dentatum), and Chinese snowball (V. macrocephalum).

  • Viburnum opulus roseum (plant)

    viburnum: … variety roseum, is known as snowball, or guelder rose, for its round, roselike heads of sterile florets. Chinese snowball (V. macrocephalum variety sterile) and Japanese snowball (V. plicatum) are common snowball bushes with large balls of white to greenish white flowers. The 4.5-metre- (15-foot-) high black haw (V. prunifolium), of…

  • Viburnum plicatum (plant)

    viburnum: macrocephalum variety sterile) and Japanese snowball (V. plicatum) are common snowball bushes with large balls of white to greenish white flowers. The 4.5-metre- (15-foot-) high black haw (V. prunifolium), of eastern North America, has plumlike leaves, small white flower clusters, and blue-black berries.

  • Viburnum prunifolium (plant)

    viburnum: 5-metre- (15-foot-) high black haw (V. prunifolium), of eastern North America, has plumlike leaves, small white flower clusters, and blue-black berries.

  • Viburnum rufidulum (plant)

    viburnum: …North American species are the southern black haw (V. rufidulum), similar but taller; the sheepberry, or nannyberry (V. lentago), with finely toothed, oval leaves; and the arrowwood (V. dentatum), with roundish to oval, coarsely toothed leaves. Laurustinus (V. tinus), a 3-metre-tall evergreen with oblong leaves, is native to the Mediterranean…

  • Viburnum tinus (plant)

    viburnum: Laurustinus (V. tinus), a 3-metre-tall evergreen with oblong leaves, is native to the Mediterranean area. Sweet viburnum (V. odoratissimum), from India and Japan, bears dark-green, shiny, evergreen leaves and large clusters of fragrant flowers.

  • Viburnum trilobum (plant)

    viburnum: V. trilobum, from northern North America, is similar but has short-stalked flowers and three-lobed leaves.

  • Vic (Spain)

    Vic, city, Barcelona provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Catalonia, northeastern Spain. The city is situated on the Vic Plain and lies along the Meder River, which is an affluent of the Ter River. Because it was first inhabited by the Ausetanos, an ancient

  • vic (aviation)

    formation flying: …the leader is called a vic, or a vee. An aircraft flying directly under and behind the leader is “in trail,” or in the slot position. The diamond formation, with one airplane in the slot and one on each side of the leader, is a particularly popular display formation. Finger…

  • Vic and Sade (American radio program)

    radio: Situation comedy: For example, Vic and Sade, which debuted on June 29, 1932, depicted the strange yet recognizable events in the lives of Victor Gook and his wife, Sade, who lived in “the small house halfway up the next block,” in small-town Illinois. Although the show had a sparse…

  • Vic Cathedral (cathedral, Vic, Spain)

    Vic: Vic Cathedral, founded in 1040 and reconstructed in the period 1780–1803, offers a virtual survey in architectural styles, from its original Romanesque bell tower to its Gothic altarpiece to its Neoclassical facade. It is also notable for the wall paintings of Josep Maria Sert, whose…

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