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  • Vanderbijlpark (South Africa)

    Vanderbijlpark, town, Gauteng province, South Africa, on the Vaal River, southwest of Johannesburg. It was founded in 1942 after it was determined that the South African Iron and Steel Industrial Corporation steelworks at Pretoria could no longer be expanded. Officially declared a town in 1952 when

  • Vanderbilt Club system (bridge)

    bridge: Bidding systems: The Vanderbilt Club system provided that a player with a strong hand bid one club, the lowest bid; his partner with a weak hand would bid one diamond and with a strong hand would make some other bid. Despite its technical excellence, the Vanderbilt Club system…

  • Vanderbilt Cup race (automobile racing)

    automobile racing: Early history: Later Vanderbilt Cup races were run in 1936 and 1937 at Roosevelt Raceway, Long Island, New York.

  • Vanderbilt family (American family)

    Vanderbilt family, one of the wealthiest and most prominent families in the United States. The third generation of Vanderbilts—following Cornelius and William Henry Vanderbilt—was led by three of William Henry’s four sons: Cornelius (1843–99), William Kissam (1849–1920), and George Washington

  • Vanderbilt Mansion (building, Hyde Park, New York, United States)

    Hyde Park: Nearby is the Vanderbilt Mansion, which was designed in the Italian Renaissance style for Frederick W. Vanderbilt (a son of railroad magnate William Henry Vanderbilt) and constructed (1896–98) on the grounds of the original Hyde Park estate. The mansion was dedicated as a national historic site in 1940.…

  • Vanderbilt Road (road, Nicaragua)

    Lake Nicaragua: History: …New York millionaire, developed the Vanderbilt Road—a route over which gold prospectors from New York were transported up the river and over the lake, completing the final few miles to the Pacific by stagecoach in order to take ship to San Francisco. The arrangement revived interest—which lasted for many years—in…

  • Vanderbilt University (university, Nashville-Davidson, Tennessee, United States)

    Vanderbilt University, private, coeducational institution of higher education in Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. Baccalaureate degrees are awarded through the College of Arts and Science, School of Engineering, Peabody College (education and human development), and Blair School of Music. About 40

  • Vanderbilt, Alva (American suffragist)

    Alva Belmont, prominent socialite of New York City and Newport, Rhode Island, who, in her later years, became an outspoken suffragist. Alva Smith grew up in her birthplace of Mobile, Alabama, and, after the American Civil War, in France. She married William K. Vanderbilt, grandson of Cornelius, in

  • Vanderbilt, Amy (American author and journalist)

    Amy Vanderbilt, American journalist and author, an acknowledged authority on manners, mores, and etiquette. Vanderbilt became a part-time reporter for the Staten Island Advance when she was 16. After studying in Switzerland and at the Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn, she attended New York

  • Vanderbilt, Commodore (American industrialist and philanthropist [1794–1877])

    Cornelius Vanderbilt, American shipping and railroad magnate who acquired a personal fortune of more than $100 million. The son of an impoverished farmer and boatman, Vanderbilt quit school at age 11 to work on the waterfront. In 1810 he purchased his first boat with money borrowed from his

  • Vanderbilt, Cornelius (American industrialist [1843–1899])

    Vanderbilt family: Of the three, Cornelius was by far the most devoted to furthering the family’s business and investment interests. Following his father’s death in 1885, Cornelius took charge of the various railroads and other corporations and of the philanthropic activities. He served on numerous social and civic boards, and…

  • Vanderbilt, Cornelius (American industrialist and philanthropist [1794–1877])

    Cornelius Vanderbilt, American shipping and railroad magnate who acquired a personal fortune of more than $100 million. The son of an impoverished farmer and boatman, Vanderbilt quit school at age 11 to work on the waterfront. In 1810 he purchased his first boat with money borrowed from his

  • Vanderbilt, George Washington (American scientist)

    Vanderbilt family: George Washington Vanderbilt had the least involvement with the family businesses or investments. He created a huge estate, Biltmore, near Asheville, North Carolina, and there carried on extensive experiments in scientific farming, stock breeding, and forestry. He gave large gifts to the New York Public…

  • Vanderbilt, Gertrude (American sculptor)

    Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, American sculptor and art patron, founder of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. Gertrude Vanderbilt was a great-granddaughter of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, founder of one of America’s great fortunes. From her early years she was interested in art,

  • Vanderbilt, Gloria (American author, fashion designer, and socialite)

    Gloria Vanderbilt, American socialite, artist, author, actress, and designer of textiles and fashion who was often in the public eye for her social life and professional exploits. Born into the prominent Vanderbilt family of New York, Gloria was thrust into the media spotlight from the moment of

  • Vanderbilt, Harold Stirling (American industrialist and inventor)

    Vanderbilt family: Harold Stirling Vanderbilt was also notable as the inventor of the game of contract bridge and as the skilled yachtsman who won the America’s Cup three times.

  • Vanderbilt, William Henry (American industrialist and philanthropist)

    William Henry Vanderbilt, American railroad magnate and philanthropist who nearly doubled the Vanderbilt family fortune established and in large part bequeathed to him by his father, Cornelius. A frail and seemingly unambitious youth, William was dismissed by his strong and dynamic father as

  • Vanderbilt, William Kissam (American industrialist)

    Vanderbilt family: William Kissam Vanderbilt worked with his brother Cornelius in managing the Vanderbilt investments and enterprises. But he was far less interested in business than were his brother, father, and grandfather. In 1903 William Kissam turned over management of the railroads to an outside firm and…

  • Vanderdecken (legendary figure)

    Flying Dutchman: …most common version, the captain, Vanderdecken, gambles his salvation on a rash pledge to round the Cape of Good Hope during a storm and so is condemned to that course for eternity; it is this rendering which forms the basis of the opera Der fliegende Holl?nder (1843) by the German…

  • Vanderhaeghe, Guy (Canadian author)

    Canadian literature: Fiction: …Among the Children, 2000), while Guy Vanderhaeghe’s fiction has its roots in the Prairies (The Englishman’s Boy, 1996). In Clara Callan (2001), Richard B. Wright portrays quiet lives in small-town Ontario. Ann-Marie MacDonald’s Fall on Your Knees (1996) and Alistair MacLeod’s No Great Mischief (1999) recount family sagas set on…

  • Vanderlin (island, Australia)

    Sir Edward Pellew Group: Vanderlin, the largest, is 20 miles (32 km) long by 8 miles (13 km) wide. Reached in 1644 by the Dutch navigator Abel Tasman, the island was thought to be part of the mainland and was named Cape Vanderlin. The explorer Matthew Flinders in 1802…

  • Vanderlyn, John (American painter)

    John Vanderlyn, U.S. painter and one of the first American artists to study in Paris. He was largely responsible for introducing the Neoclassical style to the United States. As a young man Vanderlyn copied a Gilbert Stuart portrait of Aaron Burr that attracted the attention of Burr. He sponsored

  • Vanderpool, Sylvia (American singer and producer)

    Sugar Hill Records: “Rapper's Delight”: …in 1979 by industry veterans Sylvia and Joe Robinson as a label for rap music (at that time a new genre), Sugar Hill Records, based in Englewood, New Jersey, was named after the upmarket section of Harlem and funded by Manhattan-based distributor Maurice Levy. Sylvia (born Sylvia Vanderpool) had a…

  • Vandervelde, émile (Belgian statesman)

    émile Vandervelde, Belgian statesman and a prominent figure in European socialism, who served in Belgian coalition governments from 1914 to 1937 and was influential in the peace negotiations following World War I. Vandervelde joined the Belgian Workers’ Party in 1889 and became a party leader. He

  • VanDerZee, James (American photographer)

    James VanDerZee, American photographer, whose portraits chronicled the Harlem Renaissance. VanDerZee made his first photographs as a boy in Lenox, Mass. By 1906 he had moved with his father and brother to Harlem in New York City, where he worked as a waiter and elevator operator. In 1915 VanDerZee

  • VanDerZee, James Augustus Joseph (American photographer)

    James VanDerZee, American photographer, whose portraits chronicled the Harlem Renaissance. VanDerZee made his first photographs as a boy in Lenox, Mass. By 1906 he had moved with his father and brother to Harlem in New York City, where he worked as a waiter and elevator operator. In 1915 VanDerZee

  • Vandross, Luther (American singer)

    Luther Vandross, American soul and pop singer, songwriter, and producer whose widespread popularity and reputation as a consummate stylist began in the early 1980s. While growing up in a public housing project on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, Vandross was encouraged to pursue music by his widowed

  • Vandross, Luther Ronzoni (American singer)

    Luther Vandross, American soul and pop singer, songwriter, and producer whose widespread popularity and reputation as a consummate stylist began in the early 1980s. While growing up in a public housing project on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, Vandross was encouraged to pursue music by his widowed

  • Vandyke collar (fashion)

    Genoese lace: …the form of deeply pointed “vandykes” (V-shaped points seen on collars in many 17th-century portraits by Anthony Van Dyck). These points began to give way in about 1600 to round, scalloped edges. Genoa was famous also for its tape lace, made from flat but curving bobbin-made tape in a needle-made…

  • Vandyke, Anthony (Flemish painter)

    Anthony van Dyck, after Peter Paul Rubens the most prominent Flemish Baroque painter of the 17th century. A prolific painter of portraits of European aristocracy, he also executed many works on religious and mythological subjects and was a fine draftsman and etcher. Van Dyck was the seventh of 12

  • vane (anatomy)

    feather: …a flattened, usually curved surface—the vane. The barbs possess further branches —the barbules—and the barbules of adjacent barbs are attached to one another by hooks, stiffening the vane. In many birds, some or all of the feathers lack the barbules or the hooks, and the plumage has a loose, hairlike…

  • vane pump (mechanics)

    pump: Positive displacement pumps.: A sliding vane pump is illustrated in Figure 3. The rotor is mounted off-centre. Rectangular vanes are positioned at regular intervals around the curved surface of the rotor. Each vane is free to move in a slot. The centrifugal force from rotation throws the vanes outward to…

  • Vane, Sir Henry, the Elder (English statesman)

    Sir Henry Vane, the Elder, English statesman, a prominent royal adviser who played an equivocal role in the events leading to the outbreak of the Civil War between King Charles I and Parliament. After serving in five Parliaments, he was appointed secretary of state by Charles I in February 1640.

  • Vane, Sir Henry, the Younger (English administrator)

    Sir Henry Vane, the Younger, English Puritan, one of the most capable administrators in Parliament during the Civil Wars between the Parliamentarians and Royalists. His father, Sir Henry Vane the Elder, was an adviser to King Charles I. Henry the Younger was converted to Puritanism in his youth,

  • Vane, Sir John Robert (British biochemist)

    Sir John Robert Vane, English biochemist who, with Sune K. Bergstr?m and Bengt Ingemar Samuelsson, won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1982 for the isolation, identification, and analysis of prostaglandins, which are biochemical compounds that influence blood pressure, body

  • Vane, Sutton (British writer)

    Sutton Vane, English playwright, remembered for his unusual and highly successful play Outward Bound (1923), about a group of passengers who find themselves making an ocean voyage on a ship that seems to have no crew. Slowly they realize that they are dead and bound for the other world, which is

  • Vanel, Charles-Marie (French actor)

    Les Diaboliques: …and a ragtag detective (Charles Vanel) is assigned to the case, the women begin to witness chilling evidence that their tormentor may not be dead at all.

  • Vanellus cinereus (bird)

    lapwing: Others are the gray-headed lapwing (Microsarcops cinereus), of eastern Asia, and the long-toed lapwing (Hemiparra crassirostris), of Africa.

  • Vanellus coronatus (bird)

    lapwing: The crowned lapwing (Stephanibyx coronatus), of Africa, has a black cap with a white ring around it. The red-wattled lapwing, Vanellus (sometimes Lobivanellus) indicus, and the yellow-wattled lapwing (V. malabaricus), of southern Asia, have wattles on the face. Others are the gray-headed lapwing (Microsarcops cinereus), of…

  • Vanellus crassirostris (bird)

    lapwing: …of eastern Asia, and the long-toed lapwing (Hemiparra crassirostris), of Africa.

  • Vanellus indicus (bird)

    lapwing: The red-wattled lapwing, Vanellus (sometimes Lobivanellus) indicus, and the yellow-wattled lapwing (V. malabaricus), of southern Asia, have wattles on the face. Others are the gray-headed lapwing (Microsarcops cinereus), of eastern Asia, and the long-toed lapwing (Hemiparra crassirostris), of Africa.

  • Vanellus malabaricus (bird)

    lapwing: … (sometimes Lobivanellus) indicus, and the yellow-wattled lapwing (V. malabaricus), of southern Asia, have wattles on the face. Others are the gray-headed lapwing (Microsarcops cinereus), of eastern Asia, and the long-toed lapwing (Hemiparra crassirostris), of Africa.

  • Vanellus vanellus (bird)

    lapwing: …Charadriidae (order Charadriiformes), especially the Eurasian lapwing, Vanellus vanellus, of farmlands and grassy plains. The name lapwing, which refers to the birds’ slow wingbeat, is sometimes applied broadly to members of the subfamily Vanellinae. Lapwings are about 30 cm (12 inches) long, with broad, rounded wings. Several species have crests,…

  • V?ner, Lake (lake, Sweden)

    Lake V?ner, largest lake in Sweden, 2,181 square miles (5,650 square km) in area, in the southwestern part of the country. The lake is about 90 miles (145 km) long and as much as 348 feet (106 metres) deep, and its surface lies 144 feet (44 metres) above sea level. The lake is fed by numerous

  • V?nern (lake, Sweden)

    Lake V?ner, largest lake in Sweden, 2,181 square miles (5,650 square km) in area, in the southwestern part of the country. The lake is about 90 miles (145 km) long and as much as 348 feet (106 metres) deep, and its surface lies 144 feet (44 metres) above sea level. The lake is fed by numerous

  • Vanessa (insect)

    brush-footed butterfly: The thistle butterfly (Vanessa) is named for its principal larval host plant. Some species, such as the painted lady (V. cardui), migrate during adulthood, traveling in large groups.

  • Vanessa (opera by Barber)

    Samuel Barber: His opera Vanessa, with libretto by longtime partner Gian Carlo Menotti and produced by the Metropolitan Opera Association, New York City, in 1958, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize.

  • Vanessa (friend of Swift)

    Jonathan Swift: Withdrawal to Ireland: …his life of another woman, Esther Vanhomrigh, whom he named Vanessa (and who also appeared in his poetry)? He had met Vanessa during his London visit of 1707–09, and in 1714 she had, despite all his admonitions, insisted on following him to Ireland. Her letters to Swift reveal her passion…

  • Vanessa atalanta (butterfly)

    admiral: The migratory red admiral (Vanessa atalanta), placed in the subfamily Nymphalinae, is widespread in Europe, Scandinavia, North America, and North Africa and feeds on stinging nettles. The western, or Weidemeyer’s, admiral (Limenitis weidemeyerii) is found in the western United States. The white admiral (L. arthemis), a species…

  • Vanessa cardui (butterfly)

    Painted lady, (Vanessa cardui), species of butterfly in the brush-footed butterfly family, Nymphalidae (order Lepidoptera), that has broad wings (span about 4 to 5 cm [1.5 to 2 inches]), with beautifully elaborate patterns of reddish orange, pink, brown, white, and blue scales. Vast numbers travel

  • Vanessa indica (butterfly)

    admiral: The Indian red admiral, V. indica, is found in the Canary Islands as well as India and is distinguished by a red band on the forewings wider than that of V. atalanta.

  • Vang Chapel (church, Poland)

    Dolno?l?skie: Geography: …and Lubi??, and the 12th-century Vang Chapel, a wooden church that originally stood in Norway before it was purchased in 1841 and painstakingly reassembled at Karpacz without using a single nail. The latter is a rare example of Nordic Romanesque architecture in Poland.

  • Vang Pao (Laotian Hmong general)

    Vang Pao, Laotian Hmong general (born December 1929, Nonghet, Xiangkhoang province, Laos—died Jan. 6, 2011, Clovis, near Fresno, Calif.), commanded Hmong guerrillas against communist forces in Laos as an ally of U.S. troops during the Vietnam War. He later founded the United Lao National

  • Vanga (ancient kingdom, India)

    West Bengal: History: …from the ancient kingdom of Vanga, or Banga. References to it occur in early Sanskrit literature, but its early history is obscure until the 3rd century bce, when it formed part of the extensive Mauryan empire inherited by the emperor Ashoka. With the decline of Mauryan power, anarchy once more…

  • Vanga (bird)

    Vanga-shrike, any of the 15 species of Madagascan birds constituting the bird family Vangidae (order Passeriformes). The coral-billed nuthatch is sometimes included. They are 13 to 30 cm (5 to 12 inches) long, with wings and tails of moderate length. The hook-tipped bill is stout and of remarkably

  • Vanga curvirostris (bird)

    vanga-shrike: The hook-billed vanga-shrike (Vanga curvirostris) is a big-billed form that catches tree frogs and lizards. The smallest species is the red-tailed vanga-shrike, or tit-shrike (Calicalicus madagascariensis).

  • vanga-shrike (bird)

    Vanga-shrike, any of the 15 species of Madagascan birds constituting the bird family Vangidae (order Passeriformes). The coral-billed nuthatch is sometimes included. They are 13 to 30 cm (5 to 12 inches) long, with wings and tails of moderate length. The hook-tipped bill is stout and of remarkably

  • Vangelis (Greek composer)
  • Vangelo secondo Matteo, Il (film by Pasolini)

    Pier Paolo Pasolini: …Il Vangelo secondo Matteo (1964; The Gospel According to Saint Matthew), is an austere, documentary-style retelling of the life and martyrdom of Jesus Christ. The comic allegory Uccellacci e Uccellini (1966; The Hawks and the Sparrows) was followed by two films attempting to re-create ancient myths from a contemporary viewpoint,…

  • Vanguard (launch vehicle)

    space exploration: The first satellites: The navy project, called Vanguard, would use a new launch vehicle based on modified Viking and Aerobee sounding rockets to orbit a small scientific satellite. Vanguard made slow progress over the subsequent two years, but, after Sputnik’s success, the White House pressed to have the satellite launched as quickly…

  • Vanguard (satellite)

    Vanguard, any of a series of three uncrewed U.S. experimental test satellites. Vanguard 1, launched March 17, 1958, was a tiny 1.47-kg (3.25-pound) sphere equipped with two radio transmitters. It was the second U.S. artificial satellite placed in orbit around Earth, the first being Explorer 1

  • Vanguard Cave (anthropological and archaeological site, Gibraltar)

    Gibraltar remains: Devil’s Tower, Gorham’s Cave, and Vanguard Cave. The first locality yielded the second Neanderthal fossil ever discovered, the skull of an older adult female; though found in 1848, it was not announced to science until 1865. In 1926 the second site yielded a Paleolithic tool assemblage and the scattered remains…

  • vanguard literature (Latin American literature)

    Latin American literature: The vanguardia: Eventually the innovations of Modernismo became routine, and poets began to look elsewhere for ways to be original. The next important artistic movement in Latin America was the avant-garde, or the vanguardia, as it is known in Spanish. This movement reflected several European movements,…

  • vanguard of the proletariat (communism)

    Vladimir Lenin: Formation of a revolutionary party: …the party as the “vanguard of the proletariat.” He conceived of the vanguard as a highly disciplined, centralized party that would work unremittingly to suffuse the proletariat with Socialist consciousness and serve as mentor, leader, and guide, constantly showing the proletariat where its true class interests lie.

  • Vanguard Unionist Progressive Party (political party, Northern Ireland)

    David Trimble: …Ireland Constitutional Convention for the Vanguard Unionist Progressive Party (VUPP) in 1975. The VUPP opposed direct rule of Northern Ireland by the British government and pushed for stringent measures against the Irish Republican Army (IRA). Trimble became deputy leader of the VUPP, supporting a coalition with the SDLP. In 1977…

  • Vanguardia Espa?ola, La (Spanish newspaper)

    La Vanguardia Espa?ola, (Spanish: “The Spanish Vanguard”), morning daily newspaper published in Barcelona, one of the largest and most influential newspapers in Spain. It was established in 1881 by Carlos Godó, in whose family it remained, as a political organ favouring the policies of Práxedes

  • vanguardia, La (Mexican newspaper)

    José Clemente Orozco: Early life and training: …artist on the revolutionary paper La vanguardia (“The Vanguard”), which was edited by Atl.

  • vanguardismo (Latin American literature)

    Latin American literature: The vanguardia: Eventually the innovations of Modernismo became routine, and poets began to look elsewhere for ways to be original. The next important artistic movement in Latin America was the avant-garde, or the vanguardia, as it is known in Spanish. This movement reflected several European movements,…

  • Vanhanen, Matti (prime minister of Finland)

    Finland: Domestic affairs: …on Finland’s policy toward Iraq, Matti Vanhanen replaced her as prime minister in June. Vanhanen retained his position when the Centre Party won a narrow victory in the 2007 parliamentary elections. The National Coalition Party finished a close second, while the Social Democrats suffered significant losses.

  • Vanhomrigh, Esther (friend of Swift)

    Jonathan Swift: Withdrawal to Ireland: …his life of another woman, Esther Vanhomrigh, whom he named Vanessa (and who also appeared in his poetry)? He had met Vanessa during his London visit of 1707–09, and in 1714 she had, despite all his admonitions, insisted on following him to Ireland. Her letters to Swift reveal her passion…

  • Vanhouttei spirea (shrub)

    spirea: Common species: …the Vanhoutte spirea, also called bridal wreath (Spiraea vanhouttei). The plant grows up to 2 metres (6 feet) high and produces graceful arching branches that bear numerous white flowers in spring. Other spring-flowering spireas include scalloped spirea (S. crenata), bridal wreath spirea (S. prunifolia), and three-lobed spirea, also known as…

  • Vanier, Jean (Swiss-born social activist, theologian, and philosopher)

    Jean Vanier, Swiss-born social activist, theologian, and philosopher who was involved in efforts to provide congenial living communities for the intellectually disabled. He was the recipient of the 2015 Templeton Prize. Vanier spent part of his childhood in Canada, which his father, Georges, served

  • vanilla (plant and flavouring)

    Vanilla, (genus Vanilla), any member of a group of tropical climbing orchids (family Orchidaceae) and the flavouring agent extracted from their pods. The vanilla beans of commerce are the cured unripe fruit of Mexican or Bourbon vanilla (Vanilla planifolia), Tahiti vanilla (V. tahitensis), and

  • Vanilla (plant and flavouring)

    Vanilla, (genus Vanilla), any member of a group of tropical climbing orchids (family Orchidaceae) and the flavouring agent extracted from their pods. The vanilla beans of commerce are the cured unripe fruit of Mexican or Bourbon vanilla (Vanilla planifolia), Tahiti vanilla (V. tahitensis), and

  • Vanilla Fudge (American rock group)

    Jeff Beck: With former Vanilla Fudge members Carmine Appice and Tim Bogert, Beck released Beck, Bogert & Appice in 1973. After its negative reception the trio disbanded, and Beck embarked on a solo career. The critically acclaimed Blow by Blow (1975), produced by Beatles collaborator George Martin

  • Vanilla planifolia (plant)

    vanilla: …unripe fruit of Mexican or Bourbon vanilla (Vanilla planifolia), Tahiti vanilla (V. tahitensis), and occasionally West Indian vanilla (V. pompona); all three species are thought to be derived from a single species native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. Vanilla had been used to flavour xocoatl, the chocolate…

  • Vanilla pompona (plant)

    vanilla: tahitensis), and occasionally West Indian vanilla (V. pompona); all three species are thought to be derived from a single species native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. Vanilla had been used to flavour xocoatl, the chocolate beverage of the Aztecs, centuries before the Spanish conquistador Hernán…

  • Vanilla tahitensis (plant)

    vanilla: …or Bourbon vanilla (Vanilla planifolia), Tahiti vanilla (V. tahitensis), and occasionally West Indian vanilla (V. pompona); all three species are thought to be derived from a single species native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. Vanilla had been used to flavour xocoatl, the chocolate beverage of the Aztecs,…

  • vanillin (biochemistry)

    chemical compound: Aromatic hydrocarbons (arenes): vanillin, for example, have pleasant aromas.

  • Vanimo (Papua New Guinea)

    Vanimo, port, island of New Guinea, northwestern Papua New Guinea, southwestern Pacific Ocean. Located on a peninsula surrounded by a white sand beach fronting the Pacific Ocean, Vanimo is about 20 miles (32 km) east of the border with the Indonesian (western) half of New Guinea. Lying on a

  • Vanir (Norse mythology)

    Vanir, in Norse mythology, race of gods responsible for wealth, fertility, and commerce and subordinate to the warlike Aesir. As reparation for the torture of their goddess Gullveig, the Vanir demanded from the Aesir monetary satisfaction or equal status. Declaring war instead, the Aesir suffered

  • Vanished, The (work by Rodin)

    Auguste Rodin: Early life and work: …influences, he molded the bronze The Vanquished, his first original work, the painful expression of a vanquished energy aspiring to rebirth. It provoked scandals in the artistic circles of Brussels and again at the Paris Salon, where it was exhibited in 1877 as The Age of Bronze. The realism of…

  • vanishing point (art)

    linear perspective: …system converge in a single vanishing point on the composition’s horizon line.

  • Vanishing Point, The (novel by Mitchell)

    W.O. Mitchell: Another novel, The Vanishing Point (1973), deals with a teacher’s involvement with Indians in southwest Alberta.

  • vanishing testes syndrome (medical disorder)

    pseudohermaphroditism: Male pseudohermaphroditism: …testes, known as the “vanishing testes syndrome.” When this occurs early in pregnancy, before androgen-induced differentiation toward male genitalia, the child is born with female genitalia. If the testes disappear during the crucial period between 8 and 10 weeks of gestation, the child is born with ambiguous genitalia, whereas…

  • Vanishing, The (film by Nyholm [2018])

    Gerard Butler: …a remote Scottish island in The Vanishing (original title Keepers).

  • vanitas (art)

    Vanitas, (from Latin vanitas, “vanity”), in art, a genre of still-life painting that flourished in the Netherlands in the early 17th century. A vanitas painting contains collections of objects symbolic of the inevitability of death and the transience and vanity of earthly achievements and

  • Vanitas (paintings by Flack)

    Audrey Flack: She applied Photo-realism to her Vanitas series, still life paintings of items ranging from flowers to jewelry to photographs of prisoners in concentration camps during the Holocaust. Notable works from that series include World War II (Vanitas) (1976–77), Marilyn (Vanitas) (1977), and Wheel of Fortune (Vanitas) (1977–78).

  • Vanitas (work by Valdés Leal)

    Juan de Nisa Valdés Leal: …produced such works as the Vanitas (1660), the Finis Gloriae Mundi and the Triumph of Death (1660 and 1672), and Jesus Disputing with the Doctors (1686), all characterized by their macabre subject matter, dynamic energy, and theatrical violence. The violence of his subjects has often distracted attention from the inventiveness…

  • Vanity Fair (novel by Thackeray)

    Vanity Fair, novel of early 19th-century English society by William Makepeace Thackeray, published serially in monthly installments from 1847 to 1848 and in book form in 1848. Thackeray’s previous writings had been published either unsigned or under pseudonyms; Vanity Fair was the first work he

  • Vanity Fair (film by Nair [2004])

    Julian Fellowes: He later wrote scripts for Vanity Fair (2004); Separate Lies (2005), which he also directed; The Young Victoria (2009); The Tourist (2010); Romeo and Juliet (2013); and The Chaperone (2018). He also published the novels Snobs (2004) and Past Imperfect (2008) and publicly acknowledged

  • Vanity Fair (American magazine)

    Vanity Fair, American magazine that covers culture, fashion, and politics. The first version of the magazine appeared in Manhattan in 1859. It was reintroduced by Condé Nast Publications in 1914. Three different versions of Vanity Fair magazine existed during the 1800s: a humorous Manhattan-based

  • Vanity of Dogmatizing, or Confidence in Opinions, The (work by Glanvill)

    Joseph Glanvill: The Vanity of Dogmatizing, or Confidence in Opinions (1661) attacked scholastic dogmatism, to which Glanvill opposed the experimental method. He admitted that universal laws could not be established in this way, but for him a scientific approach was the best available method for gaining knowledge and…

  • Vanity of Duluoz (autobiography by Kerouac)

    Jack Kerouac: Later work: Another important autobiographical book, Vanity of Duluoz (1968), recounts stories of his childhood, his schooling, and the dramatic scandals that defined early Beat legend.

  • Vanity of Human Wishes, The (poem by Johnson)

    Samuel Johnson: The Vanity of Human Wishes: In 1749 Johnson published The Vanity of Human Wishes, his most impressive poem as well as the first work published with his name. It is a panoramic survey of the futility of human pursuit of greatness and happiness. Like London,…

  • Vanivilasa Lake (lake, India)

    Chitradurga: Vanivilasa Lake, formed by impounding the waters of the Hagari River, provides irrigation for rice, sugarcane, and cotton in the surrounding area. Pop. (2001) 122,702; (2011) 140,206.

  • Vanjari (people)

    India: Rural settlement: …Banjari or Vanjari (also called Labhani), originally from Rajasthan and related to the Roma (Gypsies) of Europe, roams over large areas of central India and the Deccan, largely as agricultural labourers and construction workers. Many tribal peoples practice similar occupations seasonally. Shepherds, largely of the Gujar caste, practice transhumance in…

  • Vanloo, Carle (French painter)

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